BrowSEO IA Review and Tutorial: Account Logins

BrowSEO IA Review and Tutorial: Account Logins

BrowSEO Tutorial: How To Use IA Account Logins – how are you can use intelligent automation to log into all of your accounts at once. Intelligent automation is a big upgrade for version 3 – shinyobjectreviews.com/seo-tools-2/browseo/ – this is how are you use intelligent automation to log into all of your talents

More browseo review on vimeo:
vimeopro.com/jmdigitalmarketing/browseo

Cast: Jason Quinlan

Tags: BrowSEO, BrowSEO Account, Browseo IA, BrowSEO Tutorial, How To Use Browseo, Browseo Login, Browzio Brow.SEO, shiny object reviews, Browseo Review and BrowSEO Training

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Building products

What’s it going to take to get traction? “Make something people want.” “Minimum viable products.” “Talk to users and build features.” These are all common phrases used amongst those of us who are focused on building products. But I recently had a great reminder…

It’s amazing how much of a phenomenon American Girl is. If you aren’t familiar, in 1986, a woman named Pleasant Rowland launched a new doll company. She was fed up with the shallowness of Barbie and Cabbage Patch Kids.

Here I was, in a generation of women at the forefront of redefining women’s roles, and yet our daughters were playing with dolls that celebrated being a teen queen.

So she made her own. At first, everyone thought she couldn’t compete. But it turned out to be an instant success.

The dolls don’t stand out to me as better quality than other dolls we could buy. They’re not bad quality. But if you were to size one up against a Journey Doll at Toy R Us:

American Girl vs Journey Doll

You might fail to spot any major differences.

Journey Dolls are marketed by Toys R Us. After 5 years, they’ve sold about 1 million dolls. That’s 200,000 Journey Dolls a year.

And according to American Girl stats, they’ve sold over 30 million dolls since 1986, or roughly more than 1,000,000 American Girl dolls each year.

This isn’t a knock against Journey Dolls, but why is American Girl doing so much better?

If you have a young daughter and have visited an American Girl store, the answer might be obvious to you.

A handful of weeks ago my niece was visiting from out of town. We brainstormed a bit on things to do with her, and having lunch at the American Girl store was at the top of the list.

Before lunch, walking through the store, we saw quite a few things I haven’t seen at a Toys R Us. You can make an appointment to get your doll’s hair done. Your doll, Julie, likes music from the 70s? Here’s a child sized room where you can experience Julie’s life by hanging out in an Egg Chair, listening to 70s music, watching lava lamps, and buy matching outfits.

And it’s not just about shopping for dolls. This American Girl store had an entire book store attached to it. Pleasant wanted her dolls to help teach girls the importance women have had on the world, so each original doll also had at least 6 books with deep backstories published along with it.

It wasn’t meant to blare from the shelves on its packaging or visual appeal alone. It had a more important message — one that had to be delivered in a softer voice.

Our lunch at American Girl wasn’t an ordinary lunch. It’s fancy. White table cloths. There’s multiple courses, starting with mini cinnamon rolls. Dolls get a special seat at the table and even their own cup and saucer. Didn’t bring a doll? You can borrow one of theirs.

Of course I recognize the marketing here. A girl without an American Girl gets to borrow a doll. It’s an addictive “free taste”.

But as a parent, this was something other than just spending money. It was a meal where my daughter and niece were fully engaged. A chance for us to bond while they get to inhabit a world of their choice.

American Girl was never just a doll. Equal, if not more, time has been spent not on the features of the doll, but on stories, messaging, lunches, and activities for the humans involved.

Pleasant realized that in order to get traction in a market as crowded as toys are, where no one thought she could succeed, instead of building products, she invented experiences.

And as I see my daughter grow, it becomes more and more apparent how independent she’s getting. I feel her pushing me away so she can do things herself. I cherish experiences like our lunch at American Girl.

P.S. Please help spread this by clicking the ❤ below.

You should follow my YouTube channel, where I share more about how we run our business, do product design, market ourselves, and just get through life. And if you need a no-hassle system to track leads and manage follow-ups you should try Highrise 🙂


Building products was originally published in Signal v. Noise on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.



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Paying customers, not paying Facebook, Google, or Twitter.

Our new Basecamp Referral Program splits $100 between existing customers and new customers rather than putting it in the pocket of those that track your every move online.

Last year we experimented with running ads on Facebook, Google, and Twitter. All-in we spent 6 figures on the experiment. And then we stopped.

But what stopped us wasn’t the spend, it was the feel. Every dollar you spend is a vote, and we were casting hundreds of thousands of votes for big companies that are tracking people’s every step, every move, every curiosity, and every detail of their lives. Fuck that.

Yeah, they could bring us customers. But we don’t like the way they do it. We don’t want to be complicit in the how. No thank you, no vote.

So, armed with the dollars and the drive, how do we introduce Basecamp 3 to more people? Who can we vote for to help us do this? The answer became clear: Our customers.

Why give money to Facebook, Google, and Twitter when we can give it right back to our customers? They’re better advocates for Basecamp than any ad we can write. They’re not a platform, they’re people who know other people who can surely benefit from Basecamp just like they are.

We want to cast millions of votes with our customers. We want to pay customers for customers. So that’s what we’re going to do.

Introducing the Basecamp 3 Referrer Program.

It’s simple. Refer someone to Basecamp, and we’ll PayPal you $50 cash. And that person you referred will save $50 on their first month. We’re basically splitting $100 — half to you to say thanks for sending someone our way, and half to them to say welcome aboard!

You don’t need to apply to be part of the referral program. All you need is a Basecamp 3 login. If you’ve got one of those, you’re already on board.

Just log into your Basecamp 3 account and look in the bottom right corner of your Home screen. You’ll see something like this:

Click it. Then you’ll see something like this:

Send your link to anyone you want. Or click one of the social sharing buttons below to spread the word on your social networks.

If someone signs up, pays, and remains a customer for at least 75 days, we’ll PayPal you $50. Easy peasy.

Designed differently

We used to have a referrer/affiliate program way back when, but it was complicated, you had to apply to be part of it, etc. We didn’t want to do it that way again. And many referrer programs pay you in credit towards the product you’re using. Problem with that is that if you’re on someone else’s Basecamp account, then your referral would give them credit. You wouldn’t see any of that cash. Not good either.

So we designed this program to pay cash to the person to referred, not credit to the account they’re part of. Now everyone can make a little something when they tell other people about Basecamp.

One for One

Ideally, we’d love to see every customer we have bring us just one more customer a year. That would be an amazing outcome.

Everyone’s gotta know at least one person who’s struggling at another small business with messy email chains, out of date files, stuff slipping through the cracks, constant hold-ups waiting for other people to get you information, and work scattered all over the place. Someone you know is swamped, and the tools they’re using are partially to blame. Let’s help them!

Save yourself $50 and do some good

If you aren’t already a Basecamp 3 customer, but you’ve been considering it, now’s a great time to try. Use my referrer link and you’ll save $50 off your first month. And I’ll donate the $50 that I’d be getting to the Chicago Food Depository.


Paying customers, not paying Facebook, Google, or Twitter. was originally published in Signal v. Noise on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.



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Launch: Our Knowledge Center!

I’ve always believed that getting to know your company better requires more than using a piece of software alone. Yes, Know Your Company has been helpful to thousands of people all over the world…

But if you want to foster a sustainable culture of feedback within your team, you have to change how you do things day in, day out. You have to shift your mindset. You have to practice a methodology.

We’ve spent the past three years developing that methodology. And finally, we created a resource to share it with you.

Today, we’re launching our brand new Knowledge Center — a place for every employee, manager and CEO to learn our methodology on how to cultivate open, honest workplace environments.

Based on insights and data we’ve collected from over 15,000 employees at hundreds of companies in 25 countries, we’ve distilled all our learnings into 21 chapters I’ve written for our Knowledge Center.

These chapters are organized into six different topic areas…

  • Blindspots: How to uncover common leadership pitfalls.
  • Asking for feedback: How to get employees talking about how they actually feel (and not just what they think you want to hear).
  • Receiving feedback: How to receive feedback in the right way to encourage employees to open up more.
  • Acting on feedback: How to handle feedback once you receive it.
  • Creating a culture of feedback: How to build a sustainable culture of feedback within your team.

Most of the chapters are a quick 2–3 minute read. A few take around 5–7 minutes to get through. So you can read just one if you’re short on time. Or you can take a deep dive and immerse yourself in an entire guide, while you’re on the train etc.

You can read the first three chapters on “Blindspots” here.

Every week, I’ll release a new chapter. To get each chapter delivered straight to your inbox, sign up below:

https://medium.com/media/f7d2797cfc84f8e3af221b97d63d8d5a/href

To me, this Knowledge Center gets us one step closer to creating a world where everyone can communicate openly and honestly at work. We hope reading and subscribing to the Knowledge Center helps you get one step closer to feeling that way at work, too.

PS: Please ❤️ this post if you’d like others to benefit from the Knowledge Center. Thanks so much (and please say hi at @cjlew23!)


Launch: Our Knowledge Center! 📚 was originally published in Signal v. Noise on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.



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11 ways to get feedback from your most introverted employee

I’m an introvert. Most people don’t believe me when I tell them this (I do a lot of public speaking for an introvert 😳), but I am an introvert through-and-through. When I need to recharge, I seek alone time as opposed to being around a group people.

As an introvert, I also tend to avoid questions that seem overly personal or require long, drawn-out answers. Honestly, it can feel draining to divulge so much of myself and talk all the time.

Early in my career, I remember how this played out at work: My boss at the time would ask me for feedback about the company… And I struggled to answer his questions candidly. As introvert, I never felt comfortable being 100% transparent with him about what I thought could be better in the company.

I’m embarrassed thinking back on what was probably viewed as avoidant, disengaged behavior. It’s not that I didn’t want to be honest — I just didn’t know how.

Little did I know that, on the other end as a manager, it’s possible to create a work environment where introverts like me can feel comfortable giving their feedback. Having studied this issue and gathered insights from thousands of employees we work with through Know Your Company, I now know how to build a workplace where quieter employees feel comfortable speaking up.

Here are 11 things you can do and say today to encourage even your most introverted employee to be more forthcoming with you…

1. Set up a time to talk in advance.

My former boss used to walk up to an employee’s desk and ask her, “How are things going?” or “Wanna go grab coffee in like 10 minutes and have a quick one-on-one?” While these seem like positive, well-intentioned gestures on the surface, I remember these “surprise” requests for feedback feeling abrupt and off-putting to me as an employee. As introverts, we prefer having time to reflect, process, and prepare what we might want to share. So asking for feedback on-the-spot without a heads up doesn’t jive. Instead, set up time to ask for feedback in advance. For example you might say: “Hey ____, I would love an opportunity to grab some time with you, and simply listen to what you think could be better in the company. Do you have any time later this week or next?”

2. Be clear on the “why.”

Are you asking for feedback to “check a box” because it’s something leaders are “supposed to do”? Or do you genuinely believe that your employees’ feedback is paramount to the business as a whole? If it’s the latter, make that clear. (And if it’s the former, here’s a bit of data to understand why employee feedback matters). Oftentimes, introverts like myself don’t speak up because it’s unclear why our feedback is being asked for and if it will be valued. If I don’t hear the “why,” then I’m not going to put in the extra energy to share feedback that already feels unnatural for me to share in the first place.

As a manager, you must reveal the “why” behind you asking for feedback and show your employees why their feedback matters to you. For instance, you can say something like: “The reason I’m asking for your input is because I truly believe your suggestions will help the company get to where it needs to be in the long run.”

3. Ask “what” instead of “any.”

When you’re asking your quieter employees for feedback, pay attention to the exact words in the questions you’re asking. Using the word “what” instead of “any” invites a greater response to a question. For example, when you ask, “Do you have any feedback on how the last client meeting went?” it’s very easy for the person to default and say “no.” But when you ask, “What could have been better in that last client meeting?” that question assumes that there are things that could be better. Asking “what” instead of “any” opens the opportunity for someone to provide a more honest answer.

4. “Time box” your question.

Give your employees a specific timeframe to contextualize their feedback the next time you ask them a question. This helps more introverted employees in particular think of feedback that is more concrete to share with you. I call this “time boxing.” For example, rather than asking, “What could we do better?” which usually leads to generic, vague responses, I’ll ask, “What’s something in the past 2 weeks that we could’ve done better? ” When you narrow that frame of reference to “the past two weeks,” it’s much easier for the other person to respond. She or he is now reflecting on just the past two weeks, instead of having to jog their memory for the past year or more.

5. Ask about “one thing.”

Not only do I try to contextualize questions to specific timeframe, but I try to ask about one thing, instead of leaving a question open-ended. For example, instead of asking, “What could we have improved on in that last project?” you should ask, “What one thing in the last project could we have improved on?” By asking for “one thing,” you make the question much less overwhelming for an introverted employee to answer. And the less overwhelming the question is, the more likely it is that you’ll get a candid, in-depth answer.

6. Ask: “I feel X didn’t go well. Would you agree or disagree?”

Another way to create a safe environment for your quieter employees to open up is to admit something you’re struggling with yourself. This is particularly helpful when you’re noticing radio silence from an employee. For example, let’s say you ask her or him, “What’s one thing about the last project we could have improved on?” And the other person is clamming up and can’t seem to think of anything (even though you asked about “one thing”). Try sharing something you think didn’t go well, and say: “I feel like I personally didn’t do the best job at X. Would you agree or disagree?” This vulnerability gives permission to the other person to be critical about something they might not otherwise be.

7. Look to the future.

People tend to be more honest when you ask them about the future versus the past. This is because giving feedback about the past can feel like a negative critique about what went wrong, while giving feedback about the future is seen as a forward-looking, creative opportunity to make things better. Use this to your advantage when looking to get honest feedback from a quieter employee. For example, you can ask: “Going forward, what’s one thing you think we should try doing as a company to improve our marketing?” instead of “What should we have done to prevent the marketing initiative from failing in the past?” See how the first question about the future seems much more positive and inviting compared to the second question about the past.

8. Bring a notebook.

Whether or not you consider yourself an avid notetaker, bring a notebook to your next one-on-one with your employee. When you have a notebook in front of you and a pen in hand, you’re indicating that you’re ready to listen, absorb, and take notes on the feedback the other person is giving you. It also demonstrates that you’re not entering the conversation with an already fixed agenda of what you want to get out of it. For an introverted employee, this is especially important, as it reassures her or him that the energy it will take to open up and give honest feedback will be worth it.

9. Say thank you.

Showing gratitude to an employee who shares a dissenting point-of-view is one of the most effective ways to encourage her or him to be honest with you… Yet it’s something we often forget to do. Get into the habit of regularly saying, “I appreciate that viewpoint” or “It means a lot to hear that” or simply “Thank you” every time an employee gives you feedback. When you do, you prove that candid feedback is welcome — even if it’s an opinion you might not outright agree with. Your quieter employees will be more willing to open up again the next time around, if you show gratitude for their input.

10. Be quiet.

Perhaps the best way to show someone who is more introverted that you want to listen to their feedback is to do that: Just listen. Be quiet. Don’t rebut. Don’t talk. Don’t think about what you’re going to say next. Just listen. Why? Typically, when you respond right away, you come across as defensive. And when you come across as defensive, it means you didn’t really want to hear the feedback. This will discourage an employee from sharing their honest feedback with you in the future.

If you do feel like you need respond, you can say something like: “I’m grateful to you for sharing that. Let me take some time to digest what you’re saying and get back to you.” Introverts in particular recognize silence not as an absence of thought, but as a space for deep thinking. They’ll respect that you’re not trying to counter every point or talk over them.

11. Let her or him know WHEN you’ll follow up — and stick to it.

The biggest reason why quieter employees tend to not be as forthcoming with feedback is because of the sense of futility: It feels futile to give feedback because no action will be taken. In fact, studies have shown that futility is the #1 reason employees don’t speak up at work. This means in order to overcome the sense of futility and get honest feedback from your employees, you must communicate how you’re going to close the loop about a piece of feedback that’s been given to you.

To do this, the next time an employee shares some salient feedback with you, try saying: “This is a helpful piece of feedback. I’m going to chew on it and get back to you by next Friday on how we’ll more forward.” Or if it’s something you can take action on immediately, you can say: “Because you shared this, I’m going to change X for our next project.” If it’s something that requires some time to think through, you can say: “Can we follow-up 2 weeks from now, and I’ll have an update on where I think we should go from here?” Notice in each of these examples, I’m very specific about when I will follow up with the employee. Make sure you do the same to show you’re serious about acting on their feedback or resolving their issue in some way.

These tactics are helpful not only in asking for feedback from introverted employees, per se. As managers, founders, and CEOs, we all have at least one employee who we wish we heard from more regularly: An employee in our company who we might not see all the time, an employee who we haven’t developed a strong personal rapport with yet, or an employee who we’re dying to know what she or he really thinks.

The next time you’re wanting to get honest feedback from one of these employees, try a few of these 11 suggestions. It’s as simple as setting up a time to talk in advance or bringing a notebook (or both!).

You’ll hear more honest feedback from your employee than ever before.

If you’re looking for a way to continually get feedback from the employees you don’t typically hear from, take a look at Know Your Company. We built Know Your Company with the sole purpose of creating a safe environment for quieter employees to speak up at work. Sign up for a free trial of Know Your Company today.

Lastly, if you found this post useful, please feel free to share + give it ❤️ so others can find it too! Thanks 😊 (And please say hi at @cjlew23!)


11 ways to get feedback from your most introverted employee was originally published in Signal v. Noise on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.



[Read More …]

11 ways to get feedback from your most introverted employee

I’m an introvert. Most people don’t believe me when I tell them this (I do a lot of public speaking for an introvert 😳), but I am an introvert through-and-through. When I need to recharge, I seek alone time as opposed to being around a group people.

As an introvert, I also tend to avoid questions that seem overly personal or require long, drawn-out answers. Honestly, it can feel draining to divulge so much of myself and talk all the time.

Early in my career, I remember how this played out at work: My boss at the time would ask me for feedback about the company… And I struggled to answer his questions candidly. As introvert, I never felt comfortable being 100% transparent with him about what I thought could be better in the company.

I’m embarrassed thinking back on what was probably viewed as avoidant, disengaged behavior. It’s not that I didn’t want to be honest — I just didn’t know how.

Little did I know that, on the other end as a manager, it’s possible to create a work environment where introverts like me can feel comfortable giving their feedback. Having studied this issue and gathered insights from thousands of employees we work with through Know Your Company, I now know how to build a workplace where quieter employees feel comfortable speaking up.

Here are 11 things you can do and say today to encourage even your most introverted employee to be more forthcoming with you…

1. Set up a time to talk in advance.

My former boss used to walk up to an employee’s desk and ask her, “How are things going?” or “Wanna go grab coffee in like 10 minutes and have a quick one-on-one?” While these seem like positive, well-intentioned gestures on the surface, I remember these “surprise” requests for feedback feeling abrupt and off-putting to me as an employee. As introverts, we prefer having time to reflect, process, and prepare what we might want to share. So asking for feedback on-the-spot without a heads up doesn’t jive. Instead, set up time to ask for feedback in advance. For example you might say: “Hey ____, I would love an opportunity to grab some time with you, and simply listen to what you think could be better in the company. Do you have any time later this week or next?”

2. Be clear on the “why.”

Are you asking for feedback to “check a box” because it’s something leaders are “supposed to do”? Or do you genuinely believe that your employees’ feedback is paramount to the business as a whole? If it’s the latter, make that clear. (And if it’s the former, here’s a bit of data to understand why employee feedback matters). Oftentimes, introverts like myself don’t speak up because it’s unclear why our feedback is being asked for and if it will be valued. If I don’t hear the “why,” then I’m not going to put in the extra energy to share feedback that already feels unnatural for me to share in the first place.

As a manager, you must reveal the “why” behind you asking for feedback and show your employees why their feedback matters to you. For instance, you can say something like: “The reason I’m asking for your input is because I truly believe your suggestions will help the company get to where it needs to be in the long run.”

3. Ask “what” instead of “any.”

When you’re asking your quieter employees for feedback, pay attention to the exact words in the questions you’re asking. Using the word “what” instead of “any” invites a greater response to a question. For example, when you ask, “Do you have any feedback on how the last client meeting went?” it’s very easy for the person to default and say “no.” But when you ask, “What could have been better in that last client meeting?” that question assumes that there are things that could be better. Asking “what” instead of “any” opens the opportunity for someone to provide a more honest answer.

4. “Time box” your question.

Give your employees a specific timeframe to contextualize their feedback the next time you ask them a question. This helps more introverted employees in particular think of feedback that is more concrete to share with you. I call this “time boxing.” For example, rather than asking, “What could we do better?” which usually leads to generic, vague responses, I’ll ask, “What’s something in the past 2 weeks that we could’ve done better? ” When you narrow that frame of reference to “the past two weeks,” it’s much easier for the other person to respond. She or he is now reflecting on just the past two weeks, instead of having to jog their memory for the past year or more.

5. Ask about “one thing.”

Not only do I try to contextualize questions to specific timeframe, but I try to ask about one thing, instead of leaving a question open-ended. For example, instead of asking, “What could we have improved on in that last project?” you should ask, “What one thing in the last project could we have improved on?” By asking for “one thing,” you make the question much less overwhelming for an introverted employee to answer. And the less overwhelming the question is, the more likely it is that you’ll get a candid, in-depth answer.

6. Ask: “I feel X didn’t go well. Would you agree or disagree?”

Another way to create a safe environment for your quieter employees to open up is to admit something you’re struggling with yourself. This is particularly helpful when you’re noticing radio silence from an employee. For example, let’s say you ask her or him, “What’s one thing about the last project we could have improved on?” And the other person is clamming up and can’t seem to think of anything (even though you asked about “one thing”). Try sharing something you think didn’t go well, and say: “I feel like I personally didn’t do the best job at X. Would you agree or disagree?” This vulnerability gives permission to the other person to be critical about something they might not otherwise be.

7. Look to the future.

People tend to be more honest when you ask them about the future versus the past. This is because giving feedback about the past can feel like a negative critique about what went wrong, while giving feedback about the future is seen as a forward-looking, creative opportunity to make things better. Use this to your advantage when looking to get honest feedback from a quieter employee. For example, you can ask: “Going forward, what’s one thing you think we should try doing as a company to improve our marketing?” instead of “What should we have done to prevent the marketing initiative from failing in the past?” See how the first question about the future seems much more positive and inviting compared to the second question about the past.

8. Bring a notebook.

Whether or not you consider yourself an avid notetaker, bring a notebook to your next one-on-one with your employee. When you have a notebook in front of you and a pen in hand, you’re indicating that you’re ready to listen, absorb, and take notes on the feedback the other person is giving you. It also demonstrates that you’re not entering the conversation with an already fixed agenda of what you want to get out of it. For an introverted employee, this is especially important, as it reassures her or him that the energy it will take to open up and give honest feedback will be worth it.

9. Say thank you.

Showing gratitude to an employee who shares a dissenting point-of-view is one of the most effective ways to encourage her or him to be honest with you… Yet it’s something we often forget to do. Get into the habit of regularly saying, “I appreciate that viewpoint” or “It means a lot to hear that” or simply “Thank you” every time an employee gives you feedback. When you do, you prove that candid feedback is welcome — even if it’s an opinion you might not outright agree with. Your quieter employees will be more willing to open up again the next time around, if you show gratitude for their input.

10. Be quiet.

Perhaps the best way to show someone who is more introverted that you want to listen to their feedback is to do that: Just listen. Be quiet. Don’t rebut. Don’t talk. Don’t think about what you’re going to say next. Just listen. Why? Typically, when you respond right away, you come across as defensive. And when you come across as defensive, it means you didn’t really want to hear the feedback. This will discourage an employee from sharing their honest feedback with you in the future.

If you do feel like you need respond, you can say something like: “I’m grateful to you for sharing that. Let me take some time to digest what you’re saying and get back to you.” Introverts in particular recognize silence not as an absence of thought, but as a space for deep thinking. They’ll respect that you’re not trying to counter every point or talk over them.

11. Let her or him know WHEN you’ll follow up — and stick to it.

The biggest reason why quieter employees tend to not be as forthcoming with feedback is because of the sense of futility: It feels futile to give feedback because no action will be taken. In fact, studies have shown that futility is the #1 reason employees don’t speak up at work. This means in order to overcome the sense of futility and get honest feedback from your employees, you must communicate how you’re going to close the loop about a piece of feedback that’s been given to you.

To do this, the next time an employee shares some salient feedback with you, try saying: “This is a helpful piece of feedback. I’m going to chew on it and get back to you by next Friday on how we’ll more forward.” Or if it’s something you can take action on immediately, you can say: “Because you shared this, I’m going to change X for our next project.” If it’s something that requires some time to think through, you can say: “Can we follow-up 2 weeks from now, and I’ll have an update on where I think we should go from here?” Notice in each of these examples, I’m very specific about when I will follow up with the employee. Make sure you do the same to show you’re serious about acting on their feedback or resolving their issue in some way.

These tactics are helpful not only in asking for feedback from introverted employees, per se. As managers, founders, and CEOs, we all have at least one employee who we wish we heard from more regularly: An employee in our company who we might not see all the time, an employee who we haven’t developed a strong personal rapport with yet, or an employee who we’re dying to know what she or he really thinks.

The next time you’re wanting to get honest feedback from one of these employees, try a few of these 11 suggestions. It’s as simple as setting up a time to talk in advance or bringing a notebook (or both!).

You’ll hear more honest feedback from your employee than ever before.

If you’re looking for a way to continually get feedback from the employees you don’t typically hear from, take a look at Know Your Company. We built Know Your Company with the sole purpose of creating a safe environment for quieter employees to speak up at work. Sign up for a free trial of Know Your Company today.

Lastly, if you found this post useful, please feel free to share + give it ❤️ so others can find it too! Thanks 😊 (And please say hi at @cjlew23!)


11 ways to get feedback from your most introverted employee was originally published in Signal v. Noise on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.



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New in Basecamp 3 for iOS 3.4.1

You know that with the Android app getting updated so recently, that an update to the iOS app was not far behind. In fact, the iOS team (Jason Z, Tara, Dylan and Zach) launched the latest version last week! It’s got a sweet set of new features I’m excited to share with you.

Hey! Who Moved My Pings?

In previous versions of the app, Pings were a little harder to find and challenging to start. Now Pings are smartly located in the Hey section, right at the top. You’ll see a row of avatars for your most recent pings. You can quickly start a new one or swipe through previous Pings.

You can also quick swipe on items in the Hey menu to mark them as read:

Docs and Files List View

The team also added a list view for Docs & Files, with new file icons, smoother re-ordering, tap to preview images, and swipe to move and archive.

https://medium.com/media/db8b86ef6deee8f9f11c7f1acb5ea7e6/href

These updates, along with a batch of the usual speed enhancement fixes, have made the iOS app better than ever! You can get the latest version of Basecamp for iPhone and iPad on the App store. If you like it, please leave a review! If you don’t have Basecamp 3 yet, get started with a 30 day free trial now.


New in Basecamp 3 for iOS 3.4.1 was originally published in Signal v. Noise on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.



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